“Jaime Davidovich: Avant-Garde Adventures” at MoMA, book launch & panel discussion

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Davidovich1



To celebrate the release of the book Jaime Davidovich in conversation with/en conversación con Daniel R. Quiles,the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) and Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) will present the panel discussion Jaime Davidovich: Avant-Garde Adventures from Buenos Aires to SoHo and Beyond, related to the publication at The Museum of Modern Art’s Celeste Bartos Theater.

Speakers

Daniel R. Quiles, author of the publication and Associate Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago;
Julieta González, Artistic Director at Museo Jumex in Mexico City and Adjunct Curator of modern and contemporary art at MASP, São Paulo;
Sina Najafi, co-founder and editor-in-chief of New York based Cabinet magazine and curator of Jaime Davidovich: “The Live! Show;”
Andrew Lampert, artist, teacher and former Curator of Collections of the Anthology Film Archives.

Moderated by Stuart Comer, MoMA’s Chief Curator of Media and Performance Art.

 

Wednesday, May 3, 2017 
6:30 pm
The Museum of Modern Art
The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building
Celeste Bartos Theater
4 West 54 Street Between 5th and 6th Avenues

RSVP international@moma.org

2017 IFA–ISLAA Symposium: Beyond the Symbolic: Art and Social Engagement in the Americas

ifa-isla-symposium-2017-baja

April 14–15, 2016

This event is part of the Latin American Forum and is generously sponsored by the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art.

In the aftermath of the 2016 US Presidential Election, Tania Bruguera issued the following call to artists: “The time for the symbolic has ended. Art is now a tool—not to make the system work better, but to change the system.” This symposium interrogates the relevance of merging art and politics in the Americas, especially in works that explicitly seek to resist political oppression, economic imperialism, and legacies of colonialism through public discourse. We aim to address not only contemporary works that marshal “relational aesthetics” at a moment of profound geopolitical crisis, but any intervention that has sought to target the body politic and yield political or social transformation. Less interested in quantifying the efficacy of such works, this symposium hopes to examine larger questions regarding the potential ability of artistic practice to produce concrete results—that is, the compatibility of art and activism. What constitutes success or failure? When, if at all, must art bear the burden of achieving sociopolitical change? For whom is this art produced, and to whom is it responsible? Might failure be a desired outcome?

Organized by IFA PhD candidates in Latin American art: Brian Bentley, Madeline Murphy Turner, Sean Nesselrode Moncada, Blanca Serrano Ortiz,and Juanita Solano Roa; in conjunction with Edward J. Sullivan.


AGENDA

Friday, April 14, 2017

6:00 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks

Edward Sullivan (Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art, Institute of Fine Arts)

6:15 pm Keynote Lecture

Andrea Giunta (Tinker Visiting Professor, Columbia University, and Professor of Latin American Art, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Buenos Aires) People, Mass, Multitude

Introduced by Sean Nesselrode Moncada (PhD candidate, Institute of Fine Arts)

7:45 pm Reception

 

Saturday, April 15, 2017

 9:00 am Panel 1: Alternative Structures

Moderated by Brian Bentley (PhD candidate, Institute of Fine Arts)

Pablo Santa Olalla (PhD candidate, Historia del Arte, Universitat de Barcelona) Not Only Mart Art: From “Inobjetual” Experiences to Performance. Clemente Padín, Performativity and Activism, 1971–1977

Amanda Suhey (PhD, Art, Art History and Visual Studies, Duke University) Gold Standards/Legacies of Failure

Jessica M. Law (PhD candidate, Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory, University of British Columbia) All A are B, or No A is B, but what about C? Notes on Amalia Pica’s Diagrams

10:30 am Coffee and Tea

10:45 am Panel 2: Art/Action

Moderated by Blanca Serrano Ortiz (PhD candidate, Institute of Fine Arts)

Mya Dosch (PhD Candidate, Art History, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) Mobilizing the Aesthetics of Bureaucracy: Grupo Suma’s October 2, 1978 Interventions

Paulina Varas (Researcher and professor, Campus Creativo, Universidad Andrés Bello and Coordinator, CRAC Valparaíso, Chile) Desobedecer la Escena de Avanzada: Una lectura contextual de CADA en el Chile de los años ochenta

María del Carmen Montoya (Assistant Professor of Sculpture and Spatial Practices, Corcoran School of the Arts and Design, George Washington University) Ghana Think Tank: Creative Problem Finding on the US-Mexico Border

12:15 pm Lunch Break

1:30 pm Panel 3: Distributed Objects

Moderated by Madeline Murphy Turner (PhD candidate, Institute of Fine Arts)

Philomena López (PhD candidate, Art History, Theory and Criticism, University of California San Diego) Señor Suerte

Lorna Dillon (Associate Lecturer, Modern Languages, University of Kent) Textile Art, Collective Memory and Transitional Justice

Manuela Ochoa (Curator, Museo Nacional de la Memoria, Bogotá) When Memory Surrounded Justice

3:00 pm Coffee and Tea

3:15 pm Keynote Lecture

Coco Fusco (Andrew Banks Endowed Chair, College of the Arts, University of Florida) The Art of Intervention: Performance and the Cuban Public Sphere

Introduced by Juanita Solano Roa (PhD candidate, Institute of Fine Arts)

4:45 pm Closing Remarks Edward Sullivan (Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art, Institute of Fine Arts)

Panel discussion: “The Uncanny Work of Leandro Erlich”

poster-erlich-baja

March 29, 6:30pm

Andrea Giunta, author of exhibition catalogue essay “A Gap in the Limits of the Possible” and Professor of Latin American Art, Universidad de Buenos Aires will discuss the work of Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich, 2017 Roy R. Neuberger Exhibition Prize awardee with curators Helaine Posner and Patrice Giasson. Panelists will examine Erlich’s large-scale installation, Port of Reflections, his historical relevance, and themes of the uncanny and trompe l’oeil. The artist will join the final thirty minutes of the conversation via Skype for a Q&A with the audience.

Neuberger Museum of Art
735 Anderson Hill Road
Purchase, New York 10577

T 914 251 6100
www.neuberger.org

2017 IFA–ISLAA Symposium: Call for Papers

2017-IFA-ISLAA-Symposium-EN

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

April 14–15, 2017

Deadline: January 20, 2017

 

2017 IFA–ISLAA Symposium

Beyond the Symbolic: Art and Social Engagement in the Americas

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The Institute of Fine Arts and the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art are pleased to announce the second annual IFA–ISLAA symposium for emerging scholars. “Beyond the Symbolic: Art and Social Engagement in the Americas” will be held in New York on April 14–15, 2017. The symposium will include keynote lectures by Coco Fusco and Andrea Giunta.

 

In the aftermath of the 2016 US Presidential Election, Tania Bruguera issued the following call to artists: “The time for the symbolic has ended. Art is now a tool—not to make the system work better, but to change the system.” Recent political shifts have exposed the distrust that many feel for “the system” and the lengths that many will go to in the name of change. Across the globe, it has become clear that fantasies for the future can actually become an obstacle to achieving that very goal. We must ask: when does the desire for success become harmful, and how might failure reveal the realities experienced by the body politic? Furthermore, can artistic practice effectively engage with these phenomena?

 

A great deal of the discourse surrounding the art of the Americas has identified a seemingly inherent basis in the political. Whether taking the form of muralism in Mexico to enact revolutionary change, conceptual acts of public dissidence such as Tucumán Arde in Argentina and the interventions of the Colectivo Acciones de Arte (CADA) in Chile, or recent indictments of political violence in the work of Doris Salcedo, to name but a few examples, the lines between public controversy, state censorship, and public indifference have largely dissolved. Nonetheless, a cautious hope and a revitalized awareness of the importance of art and public action appear imperative as never before.

 

This symposium interrogates the relevance of merging art and politics in the Americas, especially in works that explicitly seek to resist political oppression, economic imperialism, and legacies of colonialism through public discourse. We aim to address not only contemporary works that marshal “relational aesthetics” at a moment of profound geopolitical crisis, but any intervention that has sought to target the body politic and yield political or social transformation. Less interested in quantifying the efficacy of such works, this symposium hopes to examine larger questions regarding the potential ability of artistic practice to produce concrete results—that is, the compatibility of art and activism. What constitutes success or failure? When, if at all, must art bear the burden of achieving sociopolitical change? For whom is this art produced, and to whom is it responsible? Might failure be a desired outcome?

 

Possible topics may include but are not limited to

 

  • The politics of failure
  • State censorship and models of resistance
  • The risks of optimism
  • Difference and empathy
  • The ethical use of relics of violence
  • Ephemeral art and its afterlives
  • Parody, satire, and humor
  • Ritual and public performance
  • The ideologies of “apolitical” art and social apathy
  • Media interventions and guerilla tactics
  • New media as a pathway to new audiences
  • Surveillance and subterfuge
  • “Culture wars,” state funding, and standards of decency
  • Curatorial initiatives and counter-histories (e.g. Red conceptualismos del sur)
  • Reception history and historical reevaluation

 

Current graduate students, recent graduates, and emerging scholars are invited to apply. Applicants from fields outside the realm of art history are highly encouraged (e.g. Cinema and Media Studies, Performance Studies, Latin American and Latinx studies, Cultural Studies, History). Papers in languages other than English will be taken into consideration.

 

To apply, please submit an abstract of up to 300 words to symposium@islaa.org by Friday, January 20, 2017. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance by Monday, February 13, 2017. Presentations will be limited to 20 minutes, with additional time for discussion. In your application, please indicate your current institutional affiliation and from where you will be traveling. Limited funding will be available to assist with travel expenses.

 

This symposium is part of the Latin American Forum. Generously funded by theInstitute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) and coordinated by Professor Edward J. Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art, the Forum invites distinguished visiting lecturers to the IFA to foster greater understanding and recognition of Latin American art around the world. The symposium is organized by current IFA PhD candidates Brian Bentley, Madeline Murphy Turner, Sean Nesselrode Moncada, and Blanca Serrano Ortiz de Solórzano, and Juanita Solano Roa.

 

For further information or with any questions, please contact symposium@islaa.org.

 

———

 2017-IFA-ISLAA-Symposium-SP

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

14 y 15 de abril de 2017

Fecha límite para el envío de propuestas: 20 de enero de 2017

 

Simposio IFA–ISLAA 2017

Más allá de lo simbólico: arte y compromiso social en las Américas

 

Convocatoria para el envío de propuestas

 

El Institute of Fine Arts y el Institute for Studies on Latin American Art se complacen en anunciar el segundo simposio anual IFA-ISLAA para jóvenes investigadores. “Más allá de lo simbólico: arte y compromiso social en las Américas” tendrá lugar los días 14 y 15 de abril de 2017 en Nueva York. El simposio contará con dos conferencias magistrales dictadas por Coco Fusco y Andrea Giunta.

 

A raíz del resultado de las elecciones presidenciales de Estados Unidos en 2016, Tania Bruguera hizo el siguiente llamamiento a los artistas: “El tiempo para lo simbólico ha terminado. El arte es hoy una herramienta, no para que el sistema funcione mejor, sino para cambiarlo.” Los recientes acontecimientos políticos han revelado la desconfianza que muchos sienten hacia “el sistema” y lo lejos que éstos pretenden llegar en nombre de tal cambio. A lo largo y ancho del mundo se ha hecho evidente que imaginar acerca del futuro puede, de hecho, convertirse en un obstáculo a la hora de alcanzar un objetivo. Debemos, entonces, preguntarnos: ¿Cuándo pasa el ansia de éxito a convertirse en algo dañino? ¿Y cómo puede el fracaso desvelar las realidades que experimenta el cuerpo político? Más aún, ¿puede la práctica artística involucrarse de manera eficaz en estos fenómenos?

 

El discurso generado alrededor del arte de las Américas con frecuencia ha estado basado en la identificación de un elemento político aparentemente inherente al arte de esta zona. Ya sea tomando la forma del muralismo en México para promulgar un cambio revolucionario, o a través de acciones conceptuales de disidencia ciudadana, como Tucumán Arde en Argentina y las intervenciones del Colectivo Acciones de Arte (CADA) en Chile, o en las recientes denuncias de violencia política en la obra de Doris Salcedo, por mencionar tan sólo algunos ejemplos, las fronteras entre la controversia pública, la censura estatal y la indiferencia generalizada, en gran medida han quedado disueltas. Sin embargo, la esperanza cautelosa y una revitalización de la conciencia acerca de la importancia del arte y de la acción pública parecen más imperiosas que nunca.

 

Este simposio interroga la relevancia de la unión entre arte y política en las Américas, especialmente en obras que explícitamente buscan resistirse a la opresión política, al imperialismo económico y a los legados del colonialismo en el discurso público. El simposio pretende abordar no sólo obras contemporáneas organizadas en torno a la idea de una “estética relacional” durante un periodo de profunda crisis geopolítica, sino también cualquier tipo de intervención que haya buscado dirigirse al cuerpo político con el fin de provocar una transformación política o social. Más que orientado a cuantificar la eficacia de esta clase de obras, este simposio aspira a examinar preguntas más amplias en relación a la capacidad potencial del arte para producir resultados concretos – esto es, la compatibilidad entre el arte y el activismo. ¿Qué constituye el éxito y el fracaso? ¿En qué momento, llegado el caso, debe el arte asumir la carga de lograr un cambio socio-político? ¿Para quién se crea este tipo de arte y de quién es este arte responsable? ¿Puede el fracaso constituir un resultado deseado?

 

Algunos temas posibles incluyen, pero no se limitan a:

 

  • Las políticas del fracaso
  • Censura de Estado y modelos de resistencia
  • Los riesgos del optimismo
  • Diferencias y empatía
  • El uso ético de los restos de la violencia
  • Las posibles vidas del arte efímero
  • Parodia, sátira y humor
  • Ritual y performance públicos
  • Las ideologías del arte “apolítico” y de la apatía social
  • Intervenciones del medio y tácticas de guerrilla
  • Nuevos medios para alcanzar nuevas audiencias
  • Vigilancia y subterfugio
  • “Guerras culturales,” financiación estatal y estándares de decencia
  • Iniciativas curatoriales y contra-historias (e.g. Red conceptualismos del sur)
  • Historia de la recepción y de la reevaluación histórica

 

Estudiantes de postgrado, recién graduados e investigadores emergentes están invitados a postularse. Académicos que trabajen fuera del ámbito de la historia del arte (por ejemplo, cine y ciencias de la información, estudios de performance, estudios latinoamericanos y Latinx, estudios culturales e historia) también serán bienvenidos. Aquellas propuestas presentadas en otro idioma que no sea el inglés serán así mismo consideradas.

 

Para postularse, por favor enviar una propuesta de máximo 300 palabras a symposium@islaa.org antes del viernes 20 de enero de 2017. Los candidatos serán notificados acerca de su aceptación a partir del lunes 13 de febrero de 2017. Las presentaciones deberán limitarse a 20 minutos y habrá tiempo adicional para el debate. Por favor, indicar en la propuesta su afiliación institucional actual, así como el lugar desde donde viajará en caso de ser aceptado para participar en la conferencia. Existen fondos limitados disponibles para los costos de viaje.

 

Este simposio es parte del Latin American Forum. Generosamente financiado por elInstitute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) y coordinado por el Doctor Edward J. Edward J. Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art, el Forum invita a distinguidos académicos a presentar su trabajo en el IFA con el fin de fomentar una mayor comprensión y reconocimiento del arte latinoamericano en todo el mundo. El simposio está organizado por los candidatos a doctorado del IFA Brian Bentley, Madeline Murphy Turner, Sean Nesselrode Moncada, Blanca Serrano Ortiz de Solórzano y Juanita Solano Roa.

 

Para más información y consultas, por favor póngase en contacto con nosotros a través de: symposium@islaa.org.

———

2017-IFA-ISLAA-Symposium-PT

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

14 e 15 de abril de 2017
Data limite para envio da candidatura: 20 de janeiro de 2017

 

Simpósio IFA-ISLAA 2017

Para além do simbólico: Arte e compromisso social nas Américas

 

CHAMADA PARA TRABALHOS

 

O Institute of Fine Arts e o Institute for Studies on Latin American Art, têm o prazer de anunciar o segundo simpósio anual IFA-ISLAA para jovens pesquisadores. “Para além do simbólico: Arte e compromisso social nas Américas” ocorrerá em Nova Iorque, nos dia 14 e 15 de abril de 2017. O simpósio contará com duas palestras inaugurais de Coco Fusco e Andrea Giunta.

 

À vista dos resultados da eleição presidencial de 2016 nos Estados Unidos, Tania Bruguera fez o seguinte chamado aos artistas: “O tempo para o simbólico terminou. A arte é agora uma ferramenta—não para fazer o sistema funcionar melhor, mas para mudá-lo.” Mudanças políticas recentes expuseram a desconfiança que muitos sentem pelo “sistema” e as distâncias que muitos percorrerão em nome da mudança. Ao redor do globo, tornou-se claro que fantasiar sobre o futuro pode, na verdade, se tornar um obstáculo para alcançar a tal mudança. Devemos então questionar: quando o desejo pelo sucesso se torna algo perigoso? E como pode o fracasso revelar as realidades experienciadas pelo corpo político? Além disso, pode a prática artística engajar-se efetivamente com esse fenômeno?

 

Grande parte do discurso em torno da arte das Américas identificou uma base aparentemente inerente à política. Seja tomando a forma do muralismo no México para performar uma mudança revolucionária, atos conceituais de dissidência pública como a Tucumán Arde na Argentina, sejam as intervenções do Colectivo Acciones de Arte (CADA) no Chile, ou as recentes denúncias de violência política presentes no trabalho de Doris Salcedo, para nomear apenas alguns exemplos, os limites entre controvérsia pública, censura estatal, e indiferença generalizada, dissolveram-se grandemente. Não obstante, uma esperança cautelosa e uma consciência revitalizada sobre a importância da arte e da ação pública aparecem imperativas como nunca antes.

Esse simpósio interroga a relevância da união entre arte e política nas Américas, especialmente em obras que buscam explicitamente resistir à opressão política, ao imperialismo econômico, e aos legados do colonialismo através do discurso público. O simpósio procura abarcar não somente obras contemporâneas organizadas em torno da idéia de uma “estética relacional” em um momento de profunda crise geopolítica, mas também qualquer intervenção que busque atingir o corpo político e produza transformações políticas ou sociais. Menos interessado em quantificar a eficácia desses trabalhos, o simpósio espera examinar questões maiores referentes a capacidade potencial da arte em produzir resultados concretos – isso é, a compatibilidade entre a arte e o ativismo. O que constitui o êxito e o fracasso? Em que momento, se for o caso, deve a arte carregar o fardo de alcançar mudanças sociopolíticas? Para quem esse tipo de arte é produzida, e por quem é ela responsável? Pode o fracasso constituir o resultado desejado?

 

Temas possíveis podem incluir, mas não limitam-se a:

 

  • A política do fracasso
  • Censura estatal e modelos de resistência
  • Os riscos do otimismo
  • Diferença e empatia
  • O uso ético de relíquias da violência
  • Arte efêmera e suas vidas possíveis
  • Paródia, sátira e humor
  • Ritual e performance pública
  • As ideologias da arte “apolítica” e a apatia social
  • Intervenção midiática e táticas de guerrilha
  • Novos meios para alcançar novas audiências
  • Vigilância e subterfúgio
  • “Guerras culturais”, financiamento estatal, e padrões de decência
  • Iniciativas curatoriais e contra-histórias (p. ex. Red conceptualismos del sur)
  • História da recepção e reavaliação histórica

 

Pós-graduandos, recém graduados, e jovens pesquisadores, são convidados a se inscreverem. Candidatos de áreas fora do campo da História da Arte (p. ex. Cinema, Estudos de Mídia, Estudos de Performance, Estudos da América Latina e Latinxs, História, Estudos Culturais) são fortemente encorajados a se inscreverem. Trabalhos em outro idioma que não seja o inglês, serão levados em consideração.

 

Para candidatar-se, por favor envie um resumo de seu trabalho com no máximo 300 palavras para symposium@islaa.org, até sexta-feira, dia 20 de janeiro de 2017. Os candidatos serão notificados de suas aprovações na segunda-feira, dia 13 de fevereiro de 2017. As apresentações terão o limite de 20 minutos de duração, com tempo adicional previsto para discussão. Em sua candidatura, por favor indique sua afiliação institucional atual e de onde estará viajando. Contaremos com um fundo limitado para gastos de viagem.

 

Esse simpósio é parte do Latin American Forum. Generosamente financiado pelo Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) e coordenado pelo Professor Edward J. Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art, o Fórum convida os distintos acadêmicos visitantes a apresentarem seus trabalhos no IFA a fim de fomentar um maior entendimento e reconhecimento da arte latino-americana pelo mundo. O simpósio é organizado pelos atuais candidatos ao doutorado do IFA, Brian Bentley, Madeline Murphy Turner, Sean Nesselrode Moncada, Blanca Serrano Ortiz de Solórzano, e Juanita Solano Roa.

 

Para mais informações ou questionamentos, por favor contate-nos: symposium@islaa.org.

 

 

 

WALTERCIO CALDAS AND ARIEL JIMÉNEZ AT NYPL

NOVEMBER 16, 2016

The Space Between Things: A Conversation with Waltercio Caldas

News_Caldas_Jimenez_BookExcerpt1v.2

Cover of Waltercio Caldas in conversation with/en conversación con Ariel Jiménez

 This event will be livestreamed.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016
6:00–7:30 pm
The New York Public Library
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Celeste Auditorium
476 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10018

Register Here

The Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) has published the ninth book in its acclaimed bilingual publication series Conversations/Conversaciones. To present Waltercio Caldas in Conversation with/en conversación con Ariel Jiménez, the CPPC has invited the Brazilian artist Waltercio Caldas and the Venezuelan writer, curator and art historian, Ariel Jiménez to share their reflections with the NYPL public for their Art Talks series. They are joined by Director and Chief Curator of the CPPC, Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro, a specialist on the artist’s work and career who recently curated a solo show of Caldas’ work at the Blanton Museum of Art, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo, and Fundação Iberê Camargo.

Waltercio Caldas occupies a key role in the generation that bridges the innovations of the Concrete and Neo-Concrete artists of the 1950s/60s and today’s contemporary artists. Often simple in composition, the art of Waltercio Caldas invites a host of complex questions about perception and space. The conversation between Jiménez, Caldas, and Pérez-Barreiro will cover more than five decades of artistic production of one of Brazil’s most recognized contemporary artists. One of the issues discussed will be the challenges involved in representing the visual arts through photography and the printed page.

Waltercio Caldas was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1946. He has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro, the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin, the Kanaal Art Foundation in Belgium, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, the Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, the Centro Galego de Arte Contemporaneo in Santiago de Compostela, and the Christopher Grimes Gallery in Santa Monica, among other venues. Caldas participated in the Venice Biennial in 1997 and 2007, as well as several São Paulo and Mercosul Biennials in Brazil. His work is in collections around the world, including those of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Museum of Modern Art, São Paulo; the Coleccion Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, Caracas and New York; and the Bruce and Diane Halle Collection, Scottsdale.

Ariel Jiménez is an historian and curator of modern and contemporary art. He has curated numerous exhibitions in public and private institutions in Venezuela, Latin America, and the United States. He was Director of the Education Department at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Caracas (1984–1986); General Director of the exhibition hall at Fundación Eugenio Mendoza in Caracas (1989–1997); Chief Curator at Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (1997–2011); and Director of Museo de Arte Moderno Jesús Soto in Ciudad Bolívar (2004–2006). Currently, he works as Independent Curator and Advisor for the Colección Ignacio y Valentina Oberto in Caracas. He is a widely published author whose titles include: Soto, a monograph (Caracas: Fundación Jesús Soto and Fundación Banco de Venezuela, 2007); Alfredo Boulton y sus contemporáneos. Diálogos críticos en el arte venezolano. 1912–1974 (New York: MoMA and Fundación Cisneros, 2010) and four titles in the Conversaciones/Conversations series with Carlos Cruz-Diez (2010), Jesús Soto (2001 & 2011), Ferreira Gullar (2011); and this latest with Waltercio Caldas (2016).

Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro has been Director of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, New York and Caracas, since 2007. From 2002 to 2007 he was Curator of Latin American Art at the Blanton Museum of Art, the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to that he was Director of Visual Arts at the Americas Society, New York, and Founding Curator of the University of Essex Collection of Latin American Art in Colchester, England. He holds a PhD in Art History and Theory from the University of Essex, and an MA in Latin American Studies and Art History from the University of Aberdeen. In 2007 he was chief curator of the 6th Mercosul Biennial in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Dr. Pérez-Barreiro has published extensively on modern and contemporary art from Latin America, including María Freire (São Paulo: Cosac & Naify, 2001); editor and contributor, The Geometry of Hope: Latin American Abstract Art from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection (Austin: Blanton Museum of Art, 2007); and contributor to Waltercio Caldas (Austin: Blanton Museum of Art, 2014). To the Conversaciones /Conversations series he has contributed Gyula Kosice in conversation with/en conversación con Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro.

For more information:  http://bit.ly/2e6iRJT

 

 

Kati Horna and Women Photographers in Exile

Horna

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
6:00 PM in the Lecture Hall
The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
1 East 78th Street

6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public but registration is required.

New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts will cohost a panel discussion with Americas Society on Kati Horna’s photographic practice and the work of other female photographers from the perspective of mobility and exile. Edward J. Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art, Institute of Fine Arts and College of Arts and Sciences, will moderate this panel with presentations by: Jennifer Josten, assistant professor of modern and contemporary art in the History of Art and Architecture Department at the University of Pittsburgh; Christina L. De León, independent curator and PhD candidate at Bard Graduate Center; Jordana Mendelson, associate professor in the Spanish and Portuguese Department, New York University; Michel Otayek, art historian and PhD candidate at New York University’s Spanish and Portuguese Department

Jennifer Josten is assistant professor of modern and contemporary art in the History of Art and Architecture Department at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research on art and architecture in Mexico since the 1940s has been supported by fellowships from the Getty Research Institute and the FulbrightHays Program, and has been included in recent publications such as El retorno de la serpiente: Mathias Goeritz y la invención de la Arquitectura emocional (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía) and Desafío a la estabilidad: Procesos artísticos en México, 1952–1967 (Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo, UNAM).

Christina L. De León is a doctoral candidate at the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture. From 2010 to 2016 she was the associate curator at Americas Society where she worked on modern and contemporary art exhibitions and publications. She co-curated the shows For Rent: Marc Latamie (2012), Cristóbal Lehyt: Iris Sheets (2013), and Told and Untold: The Photo Stories of Kati Horna in the Illustrated Press (2016). She contributed to the catalogue Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela 1940–1978 and has written articles for Review and Americas Quarterly periodicals. De León held previous positions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Cloisters Museum and Gardens. She holds an M.A. from New York University and a B.A. from Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

Jordana Mendelson is an associate professor in the department of Spanish and Portuguese at New York University. She is the author of essays on Spanish modern art, photography, and the illustrated press and curator or co-curator of several exhibitions including: Margaret Michaelis: Photography, Vanguard and Politics in Republican Barcelona (1998), Magazines and War 1936–1939 (2007), Other Weapons: Photography and Print Culture during the Spanish Civil War (2008), and Encounters with the 1930s (2012). She is the author of Documenting Spain: Artists, Exhibition Culture, and the Modern Nation 1929–1939 (2005) and co-editor of Postcards: Ephemeral Histories of Modernity (2010).

Michel Otayek is an art historian and doctoral candidate at New York University’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He holds a degree in Law from the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, and an M.A. in art history from Hunter College in New York. Otayek’s research addresses the role of practices of visual culture, including photography, in the articulation of discourse. His work is particularly concerned with collaboratively produced cultural artifacts such as illustrated periodicals and photobooks. Currently in progress, Mr. Otayek’s dissertation undertakes a comparative analysis of the work in exile of photographers Kati Horna in Mexico and Grete Stern in Argentina. As part of his interest in foreign female photographers active in Latin America during the postwar period, he is also at work in research projects pertaining the work of Bárbara Brändli and Thea Segall in Venezuela. This event is cosponsored by The Institute of Fine Arts and The Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA). Free admission. Learn more about the exhibition of Kati Horna’s work.

This event is co-sponsored by Americas Society and The Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA). 

Learn more about the exhibition of Kati Horna’s work

 

The Other Transatlantic. Theorizing Kinetic & Op Art in Central & Eastern Europe and Latin America

Conference at the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw, Poland – October 21-22, 2016

Program 

https://artmuseum.pl/en/wydarzenia/inny-transatlantyk-sztuka-kinetyczna-i-op-art-w-europie/2  

Friday October 21, 2016

16:00 -16:20 – Welcoming Remarks

Joanna Mytkowska, Director Museum of Modern Art Warsaw
Marta Dziewanska, Curator of Research Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw

16:20 – 17:00 – Introduction or An Invitation to Hypothesize

Abigail Winograd, Independent Curator and Curatorial Fellow Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem
Dieter Roelstraete, Curator Documenta 14

17:00-19:30 – Keynote Addresses

17:00-18:00 – “Modern synchronies and anachronisms in Latin America”, Ariel Jiménez, Independent Curator, Caracas
18:00-19:00 – “Lumino-Kinetic Arrangement of the Space or the Art of L&M”, Andrzej Turowski, Profesor of Art History, University of Burgundy, Dijon
19:00-19:30 – Q&A

Saturday October 22, 2016

10:30-13:00 – The Political Context (chaired by Dieter Roelstraete)

10:30-11:10 – “Cuban Concrete Art and its Latin American Connection”, Osbel Suárez, Independent Curator, Madrid
11:10-11:50 – “Biennial of Spatial Forms in Elbląg (1965-1973) as a Social Experiment”, Anna Maria Leśniewska, IS PAN, Warsaw
11:50-12:30 – “DVIZHENIE [Movement] Group: Echoes of Avant-Garde. Controversial History of Kinetic Art in the Soviet Union”, Sasha Obukhova, Head of the Research Department of Garage, Moscow
12:30-13:00 – Q&A

13:00-14:00 – Lunch Break

14:00-16:30 – Technology and the Collective Imagination (chaired by Daniel Muzyczuk)

14:00-14:40 – “The Constructive Connection and Peripheral Modernity in former Yugoslavia and Latin America”, Armin Medosch, Artist, Writer, and Curator, Vienna
14:40-15:20 – “The Resurgence of Science Fiction in Latin America in the Space Race/Atomic Age”, Rachel Haywood Ferreira, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish in the Department of World Languages and Culture at Iowa State University, US
15:20-16:00 – “The Sigma Experience”, Attila Tordai-S., Independent Curator and Writer, Cluj
16:00-16:30 – Q&A

16:30-17:00 – Coffee Break

17:00 -19:30 – Theoretical Frameworks and the Role of Diaspora (chaired by Abigail Winograd)

17:00-17:40 – “Kinetic Art and Latin America: Some international circuits and dialogues”, Daniel Garza Usabiaga, Curator and Researcher, Artistic Director of Zona Maco, the contemporary art fair in Mexico City
17:40-18:20 – “Op and Kinetic Art in Poland circa 1965: An Exercise in Belonging”, Magdalena Moskalewicz, Art Historian, Curator, School of
the Art Intitute of Chicago, US
18:20-19:00 – “Nonobjects and Quasi-objects: Notes on a Research Agenda at the Edge of Modernity”, Monica Amor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History, Theory, & Critical Studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art, US
19:00-19:30 – Q&A

19:30-20:15 – Conclusions

 

Geometric Abstraction in the Americas: Carmen Herrera and her art worlds

CH

 

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

6:00 PM in the Lecture Hall
The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
1 East 78th Street

The exhibition CARMEN HERRERA: LINES OF SIGHT is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art until January 2, 2017. To celebrate this remarkable survey of thirty years of this Cuban-born New York based artist’s work we invite you to join art historians Alejandro Anreus (William Paterson University) and Pepe Karmel (New York University) as well as the distinguished abstract painter and long-time friend of Carmen Herrera, Tony Bechara to discuss her art and larger issues related to geometric abstraction in the twentieth century and into today. Professor Edward Sullivan will moderate and discuss Herrera’s art in a Latin American context.